Phuket Gazette

PHUKET: A teenager became the sixth person to die during Phuket’s 10 Days of Danger when he crashed his new motorcycle in Thalang last night.

Thanawat Tohting, 19, was travelling at high speed northbound on Thepkrasattri Road when the traffic light at the intersection with the airport road changed to yellow, witnesses told police.

Mr Thanawat increased his speed to make it through the light, but the car in front of him braked to stop, said Capt Narong Muangdoung of the Thalang Police.

“Mr Thanawat had to brake suddenly, lost control of the bike and veered into the median. On impact, he flew off the motorbike and struck his head against the traffic light pole,” said Capt Narong.

Mr Thanawat was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident, but was still alive when Kusoldharm Foundation rescue workers reached him just after 11pm.

They administered first aid and transported him to Thalang Hospital, where staff tried for an hour to stabilize him before sending him to Vachira Phuket Hospital, where he died shortly after arrival.

Police are waiting for test results to see if alcohol was involved in the accident.

Although Mr Thanawat is the sixth victim in Governor Maitri Inthusut’s 10 Days of Danger, which began on December 25, he is the fourth victim recorded by the Department of Disaster Prevention and Mitigation (DDPM), which is counting deaths only during the national 7 Days of Danger period, which began on December 27. (The DDPM has yet to include Mr Thanawat in their statistics.)

The road deaths reported so far in the 10 Days of Danger safety campaign are:

Dec 25 : None

Dec 26 : Pavel Khristich, 29, Ukrainian motorcyclist, Kathu (story here)

Dec 29: Sylvain Wacquez, 26, French motorcyclist, Rawai

Robert Marano, 21, Thai motorcyclist, Thung Thong

Panthida Jaruwat, 40, tour guide in bus, Patong Hill (story here)

Khanrat Kajornjit, 47, driver of car struck by bus, Patong Hill

Dec 30: Thanawat Tohting, 19, motorcyclist, Thalang
– Thawit Bilabdullar

1

Any information on whether the car driver will held responsible? I mean it's quite unusual in Phuket that a car would brake for a YELLOW light.

Posted by AFriend December 31, 2013 08:26:24PM

Reply

0    0

2

Any information on whether the car driver will held responsible? I mean it's quite unusual in Phuket that a car would brake for a YELLOW light.

Posted by AFriend

I would hope the driver of the car IS NOT held responsible. It might be unusual to stop at a yellow light, prior to turning red, but it is the law! RIP to the young teen :(

Posted by Ozmisty January 1, 2014 11:39:25AM

Reply

0    0

3

Apparently the motorbike did not touch the car and this is normal for a good driver to stop at a yellow light, at least in Europe we doing this.

Posted by concern January 1, 2014 11:53:43AM

Reply

0    0

4

Apparently the motorbike did not touch the car and this is normal for a good driver to stop at a yellow light, at least in Europe we doing this.

Posted by concern

"...at least in Europe we doing this." I do not think there would be more than a handful of countries country in the world where the people are not doing this. Even in Thailand, which is certainly high on the list of the World's Worst, at least 20% of the people will brake for a yellow light.

Posted by Nosey January 1, 2014 07:30:21PM

Reply

0    0

6

https://www.gov.uk/using-the-road-159-to-203/road-junctions-170-to-183 – 175 "If the amber light appears, you may go on only if you have already crossed the stop line or are so close to it that to stop might cause a collision." Only to point that out. Not always is braking the right thing to do. In special slowing down heavily. Anyway, no helmet, high(er) speed (up to 80km/h is legal, we did read) was not helping.

Posted by AFriend January 1, 2014 09:24:23PM

Reply

0    0

7

Apparently the motorbike did not touch the car and this is normal for a good driver to stop at a yellow light, at least in Europe we doing this.

Posted by concern

"...at least in Europe we doing this." I do not think there would be more than a handful of countries country in the world where the people are not doing this. Even in Thailand, which is certainly high on the list of the World's Worst, at least 20% of the people will brake for a yellow light.

Posted by Nosey

1) I only asked for the 'normal' responsibility. In special in cases, with an insured vehicle and a crematory service needed. 2) Yellow means worldwide; prepare for red and stop at red, if you can't cross the stop line before. 3) You all know the 2 stop lines here, before most traffic lights? If yellow before the first, brake and stop at the second. If yellow but you've already past the first line, 'move on'. It's usually a no motorbike area.

Posted by AFriend January 2, 2014 08:48:17AM

Reply

0    0

8

Apparently the motorbike did not touch the car and this is normal for a good driver to stop at a yellow light, at least in Europe we doing this.

Posted by concern

"...at least in Europe we doing this." I do not think there would be more than a handful of countries country in the world where the people are not doing this. Even in Thailand, which is certainly high on the list of the World's Worst, at least 20% of the people will brake for a yellow light.

Posted by Nosey

1) I only asked for the 'normal' responsibility. In special in cases, with an insured vehicle and a crematory service needed. 2) Yellow means worldwide; prepare for red and stop at red, if you can't cross the stop line before. 3) You all know the 2 stop lines here, before most traffic lights? If yellow before the first, brake and stop at the second. If yellow but you've already past the first line, 'move on'. It's usually a no motorbike area.

Posted by AFriend

What a wacked sense of driving logic. And trying to judge the circumstances with little info in the story is just babble.

Posted by ssi January 3, 2014 10:43:22AM

Reply

0    0

8

Apparently the motorbike did not touch the car and this is normal for a good driver to stop at a yellow light, at least in Europe we doing this.

Posted by concern

"...at least in Europe we doing this." I do not think there would be more than a handful of countries country in the world where the people are not doing this. Even in Thailand, which is certainly high on the list of the World's Worst, at least 20% of the people will brake for a yellow light.

Posted by Nosey

1) I only asked for the 'normal' responsibility. In special in cases, with an insured vehicle and a crematory service needed. 2) Yellow means worldwide; prepare for red and stop at red, if you can't cross the stop line before. 3) You all know the 2 stop lines here, before most traffic lights? If yellow before the first, brake and stop at the second. If yellow but you've already past the first line, 'move on'. It's usually a no motorbike area.

Posted by AFriend

What a wacked sense of driving logic. And trying to judge the circumstances with little info in the story is just babble.

Posted by ssi January 3, 2014 10:43:22AM

Reply

0    0

7

Apparently the motorbike did not touch the car and this is normal for a good driver to stop at a yellow light, at least in Europe we doing this.

Posted by concern

"...at least in Europe we doing this." I do not think there would be more than a handful of countries country in the world where the people are not doing this. Even in Thailand, which is certainly high on the list of the World's Worst, at least 20% of the people will brake for a yellow light.

Posted by Nosey

1) I only asked for the 'normal' responsibility. In special in cases, with an insured vehicle and a crematory service needed. 2) Yellow means worldwide; prepare for red and stop at red, if you can't cross the stop line before. 3) You all know the 2 stop lines here, before most traffic lights? If yellow before the first, brake and stop at the second. If yellow but you've already past the first line, 'move on'. It's usually a no motorbike area.

Posted by AFriend January 2, 2014 08:48:17AM

Reply

0    0

6

https://www.gov.uk/using-the-road-159-to-203/road-junctions-170-to-183 – 175 "If the amber light appears, you may go on only if you have already crossed the stop line or are so close to it that to stop might cause a collision." Only to point that out. Not always is braking the right thing to do. In special slowing down heavily. Anyway, no helmet, high(er) speed (up to 80km/h is legal, we did read) was not helping.

Posted by AFriend January 1, 2014 09:24:23PM

Reply

0    0

4

Apparently the motorbike did not touch the car and this is normal for a good driver to stop at a yellow light, at least in Europe we doing this.

Posted by concern

"...at least in Europe we doing this." I do not think there would be more than a handful of countries country in the world where the people are not doing this. Even in Thailand, which is certainly high on the list of the World's Worst, at least 20% of the people will brake for a yellow light.

Posted by Nosey January 1, 2014 07:30:21PM

Reply

0    0

3

Apparently the motorbike did not touch the car and this is normal for a good driver to stop at a yellow light, at least in Europe we doing this.

Posted by concern January 1, 2014 11:53:43AM

Reply

0    0

2

Any information on whether the car driver will held responsible? I mean it's quite unusual in Phuket that a car would brake for a YELLOW light.

Posted by AFriend

I would hope the driver of the car IS NOT held responsible. It might be unusual to stop at a yellow light, prior to turning red, but it is the law! RIP to the young teen :(

Posted by Ozmisty January 1, 2014 11:39:25AM

Reply

0    0

1

Any information on whether the car driver will held responsible? I mean it's quite unusual in Phuket that a car would brake for a YELLOW light.

Posted by AFriend December 31, 2013 08:26:24PM

Reply

0    0

Right push panel.

Close
© 2017 The Phuket Gazette Co Ltd | Desktop Version